Down syndrome diagnosis – Nova Scotia Down Syndrome Society http://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 23:28:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T230350.091.png Down syndrome diagnosis – Nova Scotia Down Syndrome Society http://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/ 32 32 Reviews | Amy Coney Barrett and the question of abortion https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/reviews-amy-coney-barrett-and-the-question-of-abortion/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 20:50:16 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/reviews-amy-coney-barrett-and-the-question-of-abortion/ With the fate of Roe v. Wade in play during Wednesday’s oral argument in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, all ears were on new Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett. People on both sides of the abortion debate wanted to get a feel for how the only woman in the Conservative bloc would intervene […]]]>

With the fate of Roe v. Wade in play during Wednesday’s oral argument in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, all ears were on new Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett.

People on both sides of the abortion debate wanted to get a feel for how the only woman in the Conservative bloc would intervene in one of the thorniest issues facing the court – and American women. Whether fairly or not, Judge Barrett’s gender has always featured prominently in speculation about its impact on the Court’s abortion case law. When former President Donald Trump chose Brett Kavanaugh to replace Judge Anthony Kennedy, he would have assured confidants that he held then-Judge Barrett in reserve in case he was able to appoint the successor to Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg, then the most ardent defender of abortion rights.

While Tories generally denounce identity politics, many nonetheless viewed Judge Barrett’s gender as an asset as the court gradually crept to the right – and into a showdown with Roe. For example, in a Editorial 2018 for BloombergConservative expert Ramesh Ponnuru called for Judge Barrett’s appointment largely because if a more conservative Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, “It would be better if it wasn’t done just by male judges, with every female justice dissenting.”

But if the Conservatives saw Justice Barrett’s gender as political cover for their decades-long plan to dismantle reproductive rights, the courts itself presented a more complicated picture on Wednesday. While she didn’t explicitly invoke her identity as a woman, she appeared to lean into her identity as a foster mother – and indeed, the only mother on the pitch – to question Roe’s foundations.

When the court reaffirmed Roe in Planned Parenthood v. Casey in 1992, judges tied the right to choose to the recognition that “Motherhood has a huge impact on a woman’s educational prospects, employment opportunities and self-determination. In a symposium with Julie Rikelman, who argued for the Mississippi abortion clinic in Wednesday’s arguments, Judge Barrett suggested that the advent of shelter laws, which allow parents to forego new -born for adoption by leaving them in hospitals or police stations, relieved women of the burdens of “forced motherhood” which hamper their professional and educational ambitions. It was a surprising exchange, which suggested that anti-abortion laws raise few constitutional issues in a world where adoption is available to those who wish to avoid parenthood.

Judge Barrett, more than any other member of the tribunal, is in an optimal position to assess the burdens of motherhood and their impact on career ambitions. After all, she is a mother of seven and has managed to combine work and family – a point senators on both sides of the aisle reiterated in her confirmation of charges hearings. In a ceremony at the Rose Garden for then-Judge Barrett, President Trump introduced his candidate as “a deeply devoted mother” who would be the first mother of school-aged children to sit in court.

Judge Barrett’s performance in oral argument on Wednesday underscored how her identity as a mother could inform her case law. In the event that Roe survives this clash with the court, there are plenty of other cases that will allow the court to reconsider this beleaguered precedent. Lower federal courts are challenging so-called grounds bans that prohibit abortion if performed for the purpose of sex or race selection, or because of detection or diagnosis of a fetal abnormality .

If Judge Barrett is willing to vote that dismantles Roe – the decision that is credited with expanding education and employment opportunities for women – a ban-of-reason challenge would allow him to do so on terms that match to her identity: a mother who raised seven children while simultaneously reaching the pinnacle of the legal profession.

Judges, as we know, are not isolated from identity politics. Judge Thurgood Marshall, the first African American to sit on the court, regularly surfaced issues of race that his white colleagues may have overlooked. Despite their ideological differences, Justice Marshall’s successor, Justice Clarence Thomas, did the same. In a 2003 case that considered the constitutionality of a law that prohibited burning a cross in public with the intent to intimidate others, Judge Thomas issued a separate opinion documenting blacks’ experience with the Ku Klux Klan . More recently, in a gun rights challenge, Justice Thomas cited the death of Emmett Till and other historic episodes of racial violence as evidence of the need for stronger Second Amendment rights.

If the court were challenged on the grounds of prohibition, the example of Judge Thomas in these earlier cases could provide a model for Judge Barrett to explicitly invoke his own experiences – and his identity – to weigh in on the thorniest issue of our time. era. Her symbolic authority as a mother of two black children and a child with Down’s syndrome could transform a decision quashing Roe from an expression of crude partisanship into a more publicly acceptable meditation on the broader questions of motherhood, personality, and birth. the dignity that the anti-choice movement has insisted on for years.


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Risk of COVID-19 hospital admission among children aged 5 to 17 with asthma in Scotland: A national incident cohort study https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/risk-of-covid-19-hospital-admission-among-children-aged-5-to-17-with-asthma-in-scotland-a-national-incident-cohort-study/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 23:30:48 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/risk-of-covid-19-hospital-admission-among-children-aged-5-to-17-with-asthma-in-scotland-a-national-incident-cohort-study/ Contextual research Evidence before this study Understanding which children with asthma are at increased risk for serious complications from COVID-19 is of critical importance in vaccine prioritization deliberations. We searched PubMed, medRxiv and SSRN for observational studies, without language restrictions, using the terms “SARS-CoV-2”, “COVID-19”, “children”, “adolescents”, “young adults” and “ asthma ”, for studies […]]]>
Contextual research

Evidence before this study

Understanding which children with asthma are at increased risk for serious complications from COVID-19 is of critical importance in vaccine prioritization deliberations. We searched PubMed, medRxiv and SSRN for observational studies, without language restrictions, using the terms “SARS-CoV-2”, “COVID-19”, “children”, “adolescents”, “young adults” and “ asthma ”, for studies published between March 1, 2020 and October 7, 2021. We did not identify any studies examining the risk of severe outbreaks of COVID-19 in children with varying severity or with asthma control . Previous work has shown that adults with poorly controlled asthma are at increased risk of serious consequences from COVID-19.

Added value of this study

To our knowledge, this is the first national study to assess the risk of hospitalization for COVID-19 in children aged 5 to 17 with markers of uncontrolled asthma. We found that children with poorly controlled asthma (defined by either a previous hospitalization for asthma or a prescription for oral corticosteroids) had an increased risk of COVID-19 hospitalization compared to those with well-controlled asthma. or without asthma. The risk ratio was significant after adjusting for age, sex, socioeconomic status, comorbidity, and previous hospitalization.

Implications of all available evidence

We provide national evidence that children and youth aged 5 to 17 with poorly controlled asthma are at increased risk of hospitalization for COVID-19. These findings were used to inform deliberations on children aged 12 to 15 to be preferred for COVID-19 vaccination. Consideration should be given to extending the vaccination offer to the youngest.


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The lessons I learned from trying to get my PCOS diagnosis as a black woman in the UK https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/the-lessons-i-learned-from-trying-to-get-my-pcos-diagnosis-as-a-black-woman-in-the-uk/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 19:00:25 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/the-lessons-i-learned-from-trying-to-get-my-pcos-diagnosis-as-a-black-woman-in-the-uk/ The first lesson came very early: not fall into a google rabbit hole. It’s late and, once again, I spend hours scouring countless illegitimate medical websites, jumping to the worst possible conclusions. Months of confusion and pain have brought me here. A pain that has made it difficult for me to be away from bed […]]]>

The first lesson came very early: not fall into a google rabbit hole.

It’s late and, once again, I spend hours scouring countless illegitimate medical websites, jumping to the worst possible conclusions. Months of confusion and pain have brought me here. A pain that has made it difficult for me to be away from bed every time my period comes. Confusion over why at 21 I live with acne worse than when I was a teenager and why I have to shave my legs almost every day. I’m desperately looking for answers and can’t stop looking.

I get more and more terrified as I read all the things that might be wrong with me, seeing words like “diabetes” and “heart disease” appear on the screen. But something on the NHS website catches my eye: polycystic ovary syndrome, or PCOS.

“Polycystic ovaries contain a large number of harmless follicles up to 8 mm (about 0.3 in)” the site reads. “Follicles are underdeveloped sacs in which eggs develop. In PCOS, these sacs are often unable to release an egg, which means ovulation does not take place.

Back then, they were just words on a page – they didn’t make sense to me – and yet they still had the ability to freak me out. I kept reading and my anxiety skyrocketed when I learned that one in ten women suffer from PCOS and, according to the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Black women are more affected than others.

Maybe this is where I should have stopped scrolling, went to bed and called my doctor the next day. But I did not do it. I scrolled in more depth, learning that PCOS is one of the leading causes of infertility and may increase the risk of endometrial cancer. I couldn’t sleep at all after reading this.

A few weeks passed and I was far too petrified by my findings on the Internet to even think of acting on it. I suppressed those thoughts and moved on with my life until my period returned and worry caught up with me.

The next lesson was fun. I decided to tell my friends about my worries and learned that the old adage is true: a shared worry really is a worry cut in half.

After sending a message in the group chat, my daughters responded to my concerns with the perfect combination of comfort and rationality. They’ve sort of mastered the art of making harsh advice feel like a warm hug. They let me know how sorry they were for what I was going through while also dissuading me from my state of anxiety and advising me to seek help.

I listened to their advice, which led to another great lesson: a positive, proactive GP really makes all the difference. I called my doctor the next day to discuss my symptoms and she was all I could hope for – a woman who didn’t make me feel like I was dramatic, listened to my concerns, and calmed my worries. She suggested that I book a blood test as soon as possible.

I saw a nurse who took my blood and let me know I will have results by next week. They were testing for a hormonal imbalance, which is said to be one of the first indicators of PCOS. It wasn’t long before the results came and I finally learned that my LH hormone levels were higher than my FSH hormone levels, an imbalance that often interferes with ovulation. From there, my GP ordered that I do an ultrasound of my ovaries, uterus, and bladder, which would confirm our concerns and ultimately lead to a diagnosis.

The following months taught me another valuable lesson: waiting is the worst. While my GP was as attentive as possible, the system she was working in was not. Months have passed and I haven’t heard anything about my scan. With each passing day, my worry grew. But all I could do was wait.

In the end, it took about three months to get the call. This is where I learned one of the hardest lessons of all: the medical system can reject you. He can literally reject you. The doctor on the other end of the phone told me that my request for an exam had been denied. I didn’t even know it was a possibility. I have been fortunate to have little experience navigating the health care system, but I did not expect people to simply say “no, we will not help you”.

It hurt. All of a sudden my anxieties of not being believed rushed to the surface. The doctor told me that they didn’t think I had PCOS because, despite everything, my period still came every month. But I knew from my research that bleeding did not equate to ovulation. Instead, it can be “anovulation”.

Fortunately, my GP was not shaken. She calmly let me know that she was going to appeal and, thanks to her persistence, I was finally selected for a scan.

The scan took place two weeks later, and during those fourteen days, I reverted to my old Google search habits in an attempt to prepare for this invasive procedure. I was pretty petrified and the cartoon drawings online didn’t do much to allay my fears.

Upon arrival, I was checked in and quickly led into a small room with two middle aged white women. I expected a warm welcome, with two mom-like characters who would calm my nerves – but I couldn’t have been more wrong. The room was cold and not from the temperature. They gave me basic instructions on what to do without trying to ease my nerves or arguing to reduce the awkwardness of the procedure too close to be comfortable.

To my surprise, the scan itself didn’t make me uncomfortable, but the interaction with the nurses did. And so, I learned another lesson: Healthcare professionals are not always so professional. Or nice. Or useful. Despite the relief that the scan itself gave me only slight discomfort, I couldn’t shake the nurses’ treatment, which was even more hurtful when I heard them strike up a brilliant conversation with each other after leaving. the room.

I immediately took advantage of the group chat to share my experience. Again my friends were heartwarming yet honest, attributing what happened to my dark skin. I knew racism, I knew medical racism, and yet I was horrified to think that this could have happened to me. I was aware of the reasons black women are so often looked down upon by medical professionals and why they often perform worse than their white counterparts. This is because we are not seen as fragile or vulnerable. Our fears and our pain are often undermined. We are simply “strong black women” and so there is never much effort to treat us gently. However, knowing all of this still hasn’t prepared me to experience it firsthand.

I guess the last lesson was the most important of all, even though it didn’t sound like it at the time. It came after the phone call that finally confirmed I had PCOS. “Yes, I thought so” were the exact words I said when the doctor told me and honestly the main emotion I felt was relief. I was relieved to have an explanation for the horrible symptoms and some sort of conclusion after months of unanswered questions.

The lesson was to always trust me. I was consoled by the fact that I had been persistent enough to fight for a diagnosis despite the constant setbacks that almost convinced me to remain silent. As the journey to my diagnosis – the wait, the rejections, the gas lighting, the abuse – hurt more than it healed, I finally had an answer. I was proud that I hadn’t given up and demanded the best for my body.


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Letters to the Editor | The Economist https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/letters-to-the-editor-the-economist/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 03:33:51 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/letters-to-the-editor-the-economist/ November 27, 2021 Listen to this story Your browser does not support the item . Enjoy more audio and podcasts on ios Where Android. Letters are welcome by e-mail at [email protected] Help to die Your claim that “the scrutiny has been intense” in assisted death cases is astounding (“A Final Choice,” November 13). Little data […]]]>
Listen to this story

Enjoy more audio and podcasts on ios Where Android.

Letters are welcome by e-mail at [email protected]

Help to die

Your claim that “the scrutiny has been intense” in assisted death cases is astounding (“A Final Choice,” November 13). Little data is available on the quality of deaths and we rely mainly on the doctor for self-report. The Dutch, world experts in assisted dying, are clear that the procedure can fail and requires “rescue” euthanasia. We don’t have any useful data on drug safety. Using death as the sole endpoint is like claiming an effective drug treatment for baldness, but ignoring vomiting and seizures. Doctors will need to prescribe untested drugs.

More and more abuses are appearing. In a Dutch euthanasia clinic, requests for assisted dying were more likely to come from single women with lower education, depressive disorder and a history of sexual abuse.

Additionally, palliative care does not thrive with assisted dying. The Belgian and Dutch growth of all palliative care services has stalled since 2012. When it comes to public support, a recent survey found that 42% of the British public believed that assisted dying meant refusing or stopping them. life-sustaining treatments, which are already legal in the country; 10% thought that physician-assisted dying was hospice-type care. Less than half understood that it was about giving lethal doses of drugs to end life.

Medical assistance in dying is not a panacea and will not stop bad deaths, especially when 118,000 people in Britain each year do not get the palliative care they desperately need. This is the real scandal.

CLAUD REGNARD
Honorary consultant in palliative medicine
Hospice St Oswald
Newcastle upon Tyne

AMY PROFFITT
President
Palliative Medicine Association
Fareham, Hampshire

ROB GEORGES
Palliative care teacher
King’s College London

Extensive Dutch investigations have revealed that thousands of patients have received lethal injections without explicit request, and that thousands of cases have gone unreported, both in clear violation of legal “safeguards”. Five years ago, the government proposed a new easing: assisted suicide for seniors who think their life is “over.”

The abuse and the slippery slope are reality. Indeed, the reality of the slope is inherent in the very file that you make of legalization. If the guiding principle is “that individuals have the right to choose how they end their lives”, why not give to every competent person who wants to be killed, whether sick or dying or young and healthy, a lethal injection?

PROFESSOR JOHN KEOWN
Kennedy Institute of Ethics
Georgetown University
Washington, CC

As the technological capacity to manipulate our human condition increases, our appreciation for the variety and possibilities of life must also increase. The evolution of prenatal testing for Down syndrome has not led to any Down deliveries in some European countries for a number of years. Parents who wish to continue a pregnancy after a positive test are considered, more or less secretly by doctors, and openly by Richard Dawkins, as irresponsible and deviant. Yet, I remember my experience in Cambridge working with people with Down’s Syndrome who revealed a lot about what it means to be fully human in ways that the university did not.

Having kept many people company as a priest after a terminal diagnosis, I have discovered the tremendous surprise of enriching experiences, both for the patients themselves and lastingly for those who love them, precisely where the control of our life is collapsing. If we are to legalize physician-assisted dying, it must be in a truly mixed system in which religious belief (whatever we mean by that slippery term) is not viewed with condescending derision. Beyond our mental and technical control, as Hamlet told Horatio, lie unsuspected things; the cracks Leonard Cohen sang about where the light breaks in.

TOWER. CHRISTOPHER SWIFT
Coreglia Antelminelli, Italy

One in six seniors experiences some form of abuse in a community setting, according to the World Health Organization. If the protection of the living cannot be guaranteed, what hope is there for the dying? You have argued that no apparent abuse of euthanasia has taken place in countries where it is legal. But there is always a shift in government mission. The world’s population of people aged 60 and over will more than double by 2050. What greater incentive will governments have to seek the easy way out for expensive retirees?

HENRY HARINGTON
Luccombe, Somerset

My wife was struggling with a fatal disease that robbed her muscles of the ability to function but left her mind intact. When she couldn’t do enough of the things that made her life meaningful, her only legal option was to stop eating and drinking. Despite the best palliative care, it took her 11 uncomfortable and painful days to die. Our pets normally die faster and painlessly.

RAYMOND SMITH
New Paltz, New York

Life, after all, is a terminal condition, and as such is “an unnecessary episode disturbing the blessed stillness of non-existence” (Schopenhauer). Since our birth, genetics and location are purely random, we should all be certain of how and when we die. A truly civilized society based on rational thought would provide the opportunity and conditions for its citizens to exercise this choice.

STEPHEN LACEY
Chelmsford, Essex

Bad advice on covid-19

Regarding the low uptake of the covid-19 vaccine in parts of Europe (“The Arc of Susceptibility”, November 13), I live in the south-eastern fringe of Bavaria, an area rich with one of the rates lowest vaccination rates in Germany and the highest number of infections. Here, as in Eastern Europe, the intensive care units are packed. Alas, we can hardly blame official negligence or misinformation for our reluctance to get bitten. Rather, it is a peculiar penchant for weak-minded charlatans, characterized by the exorbitant number of homeopaths offering their services, that is to blame.

CHRISTOPHER STEHBERGER
Traunstein, Germany

Trans-European espresso

“The disoriented express” (November 13) reported on the difficulties of interconnected rail transport in Europe. A successful service is the Léman Express, a border train that connects part of the French network to the Swiss network, helping people to leave happy in the morning after a delicious croissant and coffee, to get to work to taste good Swiss chocolate. at their desk. . Who said the train charm was over?

GöETZ GUILBEAU
Annecy, France

Rights and responsibilities

I read with interest that an American court had recognized animals as people (“Wallow on”, October 30). As soon as possible, I plan to call the police to stop the criminal gang of mice in my garage, which is raping, vandalizing and robbing me, as well as trying to break into my house.

JEAN-ASTELL
Holden, Massachusetts

This article appeared in the Letters section of the paper edition under the title “Assisted death, covid-19, Franco-Swiss trains, animal rights”


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To help people with long Covid, scientists must define it https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/to-help-people-with-long-covid-scientists-must-define-it/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/to-help-people-with-long-covid-scientists-must-define-it/ Almost of the start of the Covid pandemic, reports have piled up of persistent, strange and debilitating symptoms in survivors, a syndrome that has come to be known as long covid. The complex of fatigue, confusion, heart arrhythmias, bowel disturbances, and other issues – which can linger for months after an infection begins or occur […]]]>

Almost of the start of the Covid pandemic, reports have piled up of persistent, strange and debilitating symptoms in survivors, a syndrome that has come to be known as long covid. The complex of fatigue, confusion, heart arrhythmias, bowel disturbances, and other issues – which can linger for months after an infection begins or occur months after it seems to have ended – attracted attention and sympathy, intense patient activism, substantial interest in research, and huge public investment. Last December, the United States Congress voted $ 1.15 billion to fund four years of research into the long Covid, and in February, the The United States National Institutes of Health announced he would use these funds to create a nested set of large studies examine the experiences of adults and children with the syndrome.

What makes long Covid research urgent is also what makes it, at this point, so difficult. No one has yet been able to determine its cause, beyond the association that it occurs in people who have had Covid – or who believe they have but could not get tested for prove it. It is therefore difficult to understand and therefore predict who is vulnerable: why one patient develops lasting symptoms and another does not.

A new study of long Covid patients in France, published in November in JAMA Internal Medicine and carried out by researchers from several universities and medical centers in France and Italy, complicates this problem. The researchers asked 26,283 patients about their experiences with Covid and any long-lasting symptoms, and also analyzed their blood samples to look for antibodies that would confirm their infections. Their findings: The thing that most predicted whether patients developed long symptoms of Covid was whether they thought they had been infected, not whether their infection could be confirmed in the lab.

“Further research in this area should take into account the underlying mechanisms which may not be specific to the SARS-CoV-2 virus,” the authors wrote. “A medical evaluation of these patients may be needed to prevent symptoms due to another illness wrongly attributed to ‘long COVID’. “

This study did not disrupt long-term Covid research: the field is too new for that. But for scientists working on the problem, it underscores the difficulty of carving out a research agenda for such a new, multifaceted and widespread syndrome. And it raises the troubling prospect of having to explain to patients, without being dismissive, that the symptoms they experience may not be caused by Covid at all.

There is a long history of new illnesses brought to the attention of physicians by patients – often by women, who between monthly periods and routine gynecologist visits tend to be more in tune with their bodies than men. are not – then rejected by medicine as we imagine. Lyme disease is one example; myalgic encephalomyelitis / chronic fatigue syndrome, another. Researchers are determined that Covid will not follow this path for a long time.

“As a doctor, but also as a woman, I have seen so many of these ill-defined syndromes being rejected, and I have seen patients with no other alternative than quackery, when there is really a pathophysiological basis for their symptoms, ”says Megan Ranney, physician and associate dean at the Brown School of Public Health and co-director of a new long-running Covid initiative there. “As an emergency physician, I have seen, first-hand, patients with persistent symptoms after Covid infection who have drastically changed their lives. They deserve that we bring scientific rigor to the matter – and for people for whom some of these symptoms may exist and not be due to Covid, they also deserve some sort of explanation and treatment. “


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How a stay in intensive care can affect the brain https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/how-a-stay-in-intensive-care-can-affect-the-brain/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 20:34:32 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/how-a-stay-in-intensive-care-can-affect-the-brain/ After a long stay in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU), some people experience cognitive, emotional, or behavioral problems that persist for weeks or months. It’s a worrying problem doctors often see in older patients – and especially since so many people have been in intensive care with severe and potentially fatal cases of COVID-19. […]]]>

After a long stay in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU), some people experience cognitive, emotional, or behavioral problems that persist for weeks or months.

It’s a worrying problem doctors often see in older patients – and especially since so many people have been in intensive care with severe and potentially fatal cases of COVID-19.

“In some cases, it takes a long time to get back to normal because of the number of serious illnesses the body and brain go through, especially in the elderly,” said Dr Brad Merker, neuropsychologist at Henry Ford Health System and Director of the Post-ICU Brain Health Clinic.

To diagnose and treat neurological problems a person might experience after a hospital stay, Henry Ford established the Post-ICU Brain Health Clinic. The clinic offers specialized testing and assessment services to people aged 55 and over to diagnose any underlying brain health problem.

A d

Impact on brain health after long hospitalizations

After a long hospital stay in intensive care, some older people may develop post-ICU syndrome, or PICS. People with PICS may experience a variety of problems, including:

  • Cognitive problems. Some people experience what they describe as “brain fog”. This is usually related to cognitive difficulties, such as confusion, problems with attention, impaired thinking or reasoning, reduced concentration, or short-term memory loss.

  • Emotional or mental health problems. Depression, anxiety, or post-traumatic stress disorder can result from any life-threatening experience, such as a serious accident or emotional trauma. “A long stay in an intensive care unit in a hospital – especially during a global pandemic – can affect our brains in much the same way,” Merker said.

  • Changes in behavior or personality. This can include increased withdrawal, aggression, irritability, sudden anger or worry about minor things, or unusual sleeping patterns. “These changes are serious, especially when they impact your day-to-day functioning or your ability to work,” Merker said.

What patients can do to heal

If you’ve been in intensive care and don’t feel like yourself, Merker recommends writing down your symptoms and speaking with your family doctor. They may refer you to the Henry Ford Post-ICU Brain Health Clinic for a further evaluation, which can help identify the cause of your symptoms.

It is not just patients who are affected by hospitalizations. Family members often fulfill the important role of caregiver during the long illness of a loved one. Caregivers also experience increased stress, fatigue, depression and burnout – the effects of which can last long after the family member is discharged from the hospital, Merker said.

“Fortunately, many of these brain health issues can benefit from treatments such as talk therapy, medication, and job training, where patients learn ways to improve their thinking and daily functioning,” Merker said. .

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Henry Ford’s brain health assessments

The diagnosis of brain health problems is made by a team of certified neuropsychologists specializing in the study of brain function and its links with behavior, emotions and thinking.

“Our goal is to maximize patient recovery by diagnosing any underlying brain health problem and recommending treatments that can reduce or manage their symptoms,” said Merker.

At Henry Ford’s Post-ICU Brain Health Clinic, trained neuropsychologists assess older people who have been in intensive care to diagnose any problems. Assessments are performed over two half-day sessions, via online video tours and clinic appointments. Results, diagnosis and treatment recommendations are shared with patients and their families.

Assessment services are also available for caregivers aged 55 and over who experience persistent problems after a loved one is hospitalized.

To learn more about the Henry Ford Post-ICU Brain Health Clinic, press or click here, or call 313-874-4846.

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The Henry Ford Post-ICU Brain Health Clinic is funded by the Healthy Aging Grant provided by the Michigan Health Endowment Fund.


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Does the Duggar family hide special needs and sexual orientation? https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/does-the-duggar-family-hide-special-needs-and-sexual-orientation/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 18:04:34 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/does-the-duggar-family-hide-special-needs-and-sexual-orientation/ The Duggar family have been exposing their lives to fans and critics for years. They have had several TLC shows including 19 children and counting and Counting on. The shows featured many intimate moments, from births to weddings. Fans even watched the family discuss previous Josh Duggar scandals. However, there are a lot of moments […]]]>

The Duggar family have been exposing their lives to fans and critics for years. They have had several TLC shows including 19 children and counting and Counting on. The shows featured many intimate moments, from births to weddings. Fans even watched the family discuss previous Josh Duggar scandals.

However, there are a lot of moments that aren’t on their shows that they keep out of the public eye. While the family has their fair share of scandals, mostly related to Josh, they try to keep things positive.

So, of course, some parts of their life are a secret. Now fans are curious what the family might be keeping behind closed doors. What is the family hiding?

Duggar Family Instagram

Does the Duggar family keep secrets?

In a new confession at Duggar Bates Confessions, a fan noticed that no one in either family is known to have special needs.

One fan remarks, “A lot of fundies don’t believe in any of these unrest that can’t be ‘seen’. I was to guess that there were a few children with special needs. It just hasn’t been recognized or addressed.

Someone else writes: “The chances of having autism or Down’s syndrome increase with the age of the mother. I’m surprised they don’t have it due to Kelly Jo and Michelle’s advanced maternal age when they had some of their children.

Another thinks it has to do with the education of the Duggars and Bates. Both families home school their children. In a public school, there are more possibilities for testing and diagnosis. One user writes, “I don’t think either of their kids is, it’s that they aren’t diagnosed. Most problems tend to crop up in school (at least for us), and that leads to discussion and diagnosis. “

Someone else adds to the conversation by writing, “Same goes for sexual orientation. In 20 kids in every family, there just has to be someone gay or whatever.

Duggar Bates Confessions
Duggar Bates Confessions

There is no way to know for sure unless families share this information. But fans agree that it seems they are hiding it from the public.

So, do you think the Duggar family might be hiding information about special needs or sexual orientation? Do you think they would ever talk about these things? Let us know your thoughts in the comments section below.

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Aubrey meister
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Microlife blood pressure monitor https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/microlife-blood-pressure-monitor/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 18:21:04 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/microlife-blood-pressure-monitor/ Almost half of American adults, or 116 million, have high blood pressure or take medication for high blood pressure, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. With hypertension (or high blood pressure) comes an increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Doctors take this condition very seriously. Frequent monitoring is one of the […]]]>

Almost half of American adults, or 116 million, have high blood pressure or take medication for high blood pressure, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. With hypertension (or high blood pressure) comes an increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Doctors take this condition very seriously.

Frequent monitoring is one of the ways doctors treat high blood pressure. While some blood pressure measurements may need to be done in a doctor’s office, home blood pressure monitors can also be used in many situations.

Many people choose to take advantage of home blood pressure monitoring because it can help reduce trips to the doctor and the risk of increased blood pressure just by being around many doctors in white coats! Home monitoring also facilitates frequent testing throughout the day. This can be vital information.

If you are in the market for a home blood pressure monitor, one type that you are likely to come across is the Microlife blood pressure monitor. Wondering what this particular brand has to offer? Don’t worry … we’ve got you covered …

A blood pressure monitor (also called a sphygmomanometer) provides information about how much pressure your blood is putting on the walls of your arteries.

These devices typically include an inflatable cuff to collapse and then release the brachial artery in a controlled manner. They also include a monitoring device to track cuff pressure and display results.

Blood pressure monitors typically report two key numbers: systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure.

Systolic blood pressure (the top number) is when blood begins to flow intermittently through the artery. Diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) indicates when blood flow changes from intermittent to stable.

Microvie is an international medical diagnostics company. It specializes in the development and manufacture of:

  • blood pressure monitors
  • digital thermometers
  • Peak flow meters

Founded in Taiwan in 1981, the company opened offices in the United States in 1997. In 2009, Microlife became the first medical diagnostic company to develop a blood pressure monitor that detects both hypertension and atrial fibrillation.

Microlife blood pressure monitors have received numerous awards over the years, including validation by the British Hypertension Society with the highest AA rating possible. The company has also partnered with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to develop a cost-effective blood pressure monitor for low- and middle-income countries.

Microlife offers a variety of blood pressure monitor options via their web page and local stores (like Walmart and Costco). A popular option is the automatic wrist blood pressure monitor.

This compact style:

  • is ideal for traveling
  • store the last reading
  • includes irregular heartbeat detection technology

In addition to the wrist monitor, Microlife offers five styles of traditional cuffs that vary widely depending on the number of stored readings and analyzes the monitor will provide.

Microlife blood pressure monitors include many traditionally expected features, such as:

  • adjustable cuff
  • digital monitor that stores readings

Depending on the chosen Microlife model, additional features may be included such as:

  • the ability to store readings for two different users
  • blood pressure monitoring and analysis (including the ability to average 3 consecutive readings)
  • irregular heartbeat detection
  • hypertension risk indicator
  • AC adapter (plus battery power options)

The exact cost of a Microlife blood pressure monitor varies by model, but prices range from around $ 30 to $ 70. (This price can be even lower if your insurance covers part of the costs. Using HSA funds can also be a way to reduce the cost of this purchase.)

Already have a Microlife monitor and just need new parts? Replacement / different sized cuffs and AC adapters are also available for purchase. Your Microlife blood pressure monitor will come with a 3 or 5 year limited warranty depending on the style.

Microlife blood pressure monitors have been carefully checked. Prestigious institutions like the British Hypertension Society give them top marks.

Even if an older study found that the Omron blood pressure monitor was slightly more sensitive when it comes to blood pressure, the Microlife has always been found to be very accurate for blood pressure. It was also the only blood pressure monitor accurate enough to detect atrial fibrillation.

To ensure that your device remains accurate, Microlife recommends having your monitor checked every 2 years or after any mechanical impact (i.e. if you drop it).

Another way to increase the chances of an accurate reading is to bring your home monitor with you to the doctor’s office for a calibration. (Your doctor may take your blood pressure on your other arm at the same time and compare the results with your Microlife blood pressure monitor.)

All blood pressure monitors should help you detect whether your blood pressure is high or low. Microlife blood pressure monitors also incorporate technology to detect irregular heartbeats.

Microlife AFIB technology can detect atrial fibrillation, which is another potential risk factor for stroke. The IHB technology will look at the pulse frequency for irregular heartbeats. With IHB technology, the monitor will detect arrhythmia, but will not be able to distinguish between different types.

Advantages:

  • There are many different style options out there, so you can find one that suits you.
  • Microlife Average Mode (MAM) will automatically average the data from three consecutive readings.
  • Atrial fibrillation detection technology is available with some models.
  • Pulsed Arrhythmia Detection (PAD) technology is available with some models.

The inconvenients:

  • Consumers frequently rank Omron blood pressure monitors higher (despite the accolades received by Microlife).
  • They lack some of the technological flourishes offered by other brands.

In the United States, nearly half of the adult population has high blood pressure or takes medication. With high blood pressure comes an increased risk of heart disease and stroke, which may mean that your doctor will order more frequent blood pressure monitoring.

Home blood pressure monitors allow you to check your own blood pressure from the comfort of your home avoiding constant doctor visits and white coat syndrome. Because getting accurate readings is important, a quality blood pressure monitor (which is regularly calibrated) is important.

Microlife blood pressure monitors are a popular option. Recipients of numerous awards, these devices are medically approved for home blood pressure monitoring. Besides offering information about the pressure on your arteries, these devices stand out because they can detect atrial fibrillation and other irregular heartbeats.

It is important to keep in mind that home blood pressure monitoring is not a substitute for regular medical care. It is always important to see your doctor for routine exams, requested follow-ups, and any emergencies that may arise.


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Keke Palmer says these two symptoms helped her realize she had PCOS — see her Instagram photo https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/keke-palmer-says-these-two-symptoms-helped-her-realize-she-had-pcos-see-her-instagram-photo/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 21:30:15 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/keke-palmer-says-these-two-symptoms-helped-her-realize-she-had-pcos-see-her-instagram-photo/ Two nagging symptoms led Keke Palmer to his possible diagnosis of PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome), the actor shared in Monday’s episode of The Tamron Hall show. The scammers star, 28, revealed last December that she was diagnosed with the disease, as SELF previously reported. Her adult acne, which she shared in photos on her Instagram […]]]>

Two nagging symptoms led Keke Palmer to his possible diagnosis of PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome), the actor shared in Monday’s episode of The Tamron Hall show. The scammers star, 28, revealed last December that she was diagnosed with the disease, as SELF previously reported. Her adult acne, which she shared in photos on her Instagram last December, made her wonder if she might have an underlying disease. “I started to focus on the fact that, you know, in order for me to treat acne after puberty like I did, there had to be something deeper. that moment I ran into PCOS, ”she told Hall.

Learning about the disease also answered questions she had about other symptoms she was managing. “I kind of found out that was what I was dealing with, and it answered a lot of questions, not only why I had acne, but why I grow hair on my face. or under my chin, ”she told Hall. “I kind of have an inconspicuous beard that I have to shave every other day.”

PCOS is both a hormonal and metabolic disorder, as SELF has previously reported. Getting a diagnosis of PCOS can be a frustrating process, in part because diagnostic criteria can vary, but also because navigating the medical system can take a ton of persistence. As Palmer noted in her December Instagram post on PCOS, she had to fight to get an accurate diagnosis: “Unfortunately, doctors are people and if you don’t ‘watch the game’ they may not. think it’s your problem, ”she wrote. “They may not even suggest it if you look healthy no matter what that means!” “

Usually, to make a diagnosis of PCOS, your doctor will look for a combination of irregular periods or no periods at all, evidence that your ovaries have excess follicles (detected by an ultrasound), and androgen levels that are higher than normal. ‘habit. , which are hormones like testosterone. High levels of androgens can manifest as acne, excess hair on the face and body, and thinning of hair on the scalp. Weight gain is also associated with PCOS, although it is not clearly understood how they influence each other, according to the Centers for Disaster Control and Prevention (CDC).


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Provincial government changes to autism funding are non-scientific and discriminatory https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/provincial-government-changes-to-autism-funding-are-non-scientific-and-discriminatory/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/provincial-government-changes-to-autism-funding-are-non-scientific-and-discriminatory/ Dr Roshan Danesh, QC Commentary from a lawyer and educator who acted as special advisor on Indigenous reconciliation to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, Jody Wilson-Raybould. My son, Darwyn, was autistic and has Down’s syndrome. He died last summer at the age of 16, after a life of medical fragility that […]]]>

Dr Roshan Danesh, QC

Commentary from a lawyer and educator who acted as special advisor on Indigenous reconciliation to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, Jody Wilson-Raybould.

My son, Darwyn, was autistic and has Down’s syndrome. He died last summer at the age of 16, after a life of medical fragility that included three major open heart surgeries.

Darwyn was a lucky boy. With two lawyers as parents, and a protective and assertive big sister, he has never been short of lawyers.

Yet with all of his privileges, he still could not be protected from the additional suffering caused by BC’s ineffective system for supporting neurodiverse children.

It took a few years to get Darwyn’s autism diagnosis. By the time he was diagnosed, a fundamental age period for critical treatment had passed.

Financial aid has never been sufficient. There was never, at any time in Darwyn’s life, respite services available that could meet the depth of her needs.

Summer programs for children with special needs were unable to accommodate him. The school district attempted to shut down the only school that had the capacity to educate her and other high-impact and medically fragile children.

I could go on.

Last week, the British Columbia government announced that it would impose a new “needs-based” system located in “centers,” remove the need for diagnostics, and stop directly funding children and families for health care. choose the interventions and supports they need.

You would think, given Darwyn’s experience, that I would support such a change. I do not.

The plan presented by British Columbia could be a solution to a problem with service to neurodiverse children somewhere. But that is not the solution to the challenges of British Columbia.

At the heart of the problem that the proposed changes seek to address are unacceptable delays in diagnosing the challenges children face.

But how can a reasonable solution be to minimize the role of diagnosis itself?

Diagnosis has a scientific and medical purpose – to understand a person’s specific conditions and symptoms and to design an approach to address them. This is how all of medical science works.

We seek to apply our expertise and understanding to a challenge and then prescribe what can be done.

How many of you want to be treated for a medical problem without being diagnosed?

But instead of trying to address diagnostic delays and actually improve our diagnostic capacity – through increased support and access and new diagnostic standards – the B.C. government’s approach is to minimize the importance of the diagnosis.

It will not translate into better services for children like Darwyn. It is never better to move away from individualized care and generic systems.

The result is less focused, targeted and effective services where understanding of the specific needs and reality of children themselves is reduced.

In other words, it is anti-scientific. And it is also a recipe for discrimination.

Neurodiverse children are just that – diverse. Their conditions and the causes of their conditions are quite varied and distinct. A few children have quite severe, rare and complex needs, and they are extremely vulnerable.

Others, the majority, while certainly in need of specialized services and care, are not.

When systems become more generic and less individualized, the inevitable result is a system designed around a neurodiverse “standard”, not a system that meets the specialized needs of each child.

The end result being that the most complex and vulnerable children will suffer the most, as they are furthest from the generic norm envisioned by centralized “hubs” operating without proper diagnosis.

It is a polite way of saying that the most vulnerable will be the most exposed to danger. They will be discriminated against because their needs do not match the standard for which a generic service system is designed.

To be clear, there is a way forward for the BC government to avoid causing such harm to children.

Which means putting your current plans on hold, listening and working with children, families and caregivers to understand solutions to the real challenges that exist.

This would include exploring how individualized funding and “hubs” can be combined. It would also involve assessing the specific needs and factors that impacted services for children with disabilities due to life during COVID – something that has apparently not been considered in developing the current plan. from the government of British Columbia, which they said was based on work. and engagement in 2019.

But if the government of British Columbia does not change course, we should not be deluding ourselves about the types of discrimination and harm that could result.

Darwyn experienced such discrimination when he was at his weakest.

When he was dying, he was referred to the BC children’s hospice system.

Except there was a problem. Darwyn was not dying properly – not the way the system was designed to serve dying children.

Specifically, we were told, he was severely autistic and the system was not designed for dying children like him. Thus, we would learn, there was no hospice bed available for Darwyn as there was for the “typical” dying child.

Darwyn died at home in his own bed.

If the BC government follows through on its unscientific and discriminatory hub model, the most vulnerable children will suffer more in life and, like Darwyn, may continue to suffer more in death.


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