united states – Nova Scotia Down Syndrome Society http://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/ Sun, 20 Mar 2022 09:26:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T230350.091.png united states – Nova Scotia Down Syndrome Society http://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/ 32 32 Theme, why is it celebrated on March 21? Down Syndrome Facts https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/theme-why-is-it-celebrated-on-march-21-down-syndrome-facts/ Sun, 20 Mar 2022 09:26:18 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/theme-why-is-it-celebrated-on-march-21-down-syndrome-facts/ World Down Syndrome Day, also known as WDSD, is celebrated annually on March 21 around the world. The day was created to promote awareness of the basic rights of people with Down syndrome. The United Nations first commemorated the day in 2012. The date of March 21 was chosen to mark this day because it […]]]>

World Down Syndrome Day, also known as WDSD, is celebrated annually on March 21 around the world. The day was created to promote awareness of the basic rights of people with Down syndrome.

The United Nations first commemorated the day in 2012. The date of March 21 was chosen to mark this day because it represents the unique nature of the triplication (trisomy) of the 21st chromosome that causes Down syndrome.

World Down Syndrome Day 2022: theme

“We Decide” was chosen as the theme for the day this year. It is inspired by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and will emphasize the right to participate of people living with Down syndrome.

The concept behind this theme is to show that it is enough for one human being to connect to another and it is this connection that saves lives in the worst circumstances. People and businesses have been badly affected since the coronavirus pandemic rocked the planet. However, in these trying times, we all need to remember to take care of people with Down syndrome and make sure they are not left alone.

Down Syndrome Facts

Down syndrome is named after the English doctor, John Langdon Down, who was the first to categorize the common characteristics of people with the disease.

People with Down syndrome have an extra chromosome

Women who have had a child with Down syndrome are more likely to have another child with the disease

Each year, approximately 6,000 babies are born with Down syndrome in the United States.

Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal disorder in the United States

The incidence of births of children with Down syndrome increases with the age of the mother.

There are three types of Down syndrome: trisomy 21 (non-disjunction) represents 95% of cases, translocation represents approximately 4% and mosaicism approximately 1%.

]]>
GLOBAL Applauds Final Action on Fiscal Year 2022 Federal Expenditures Act which includes a $10 million increase for NIH Down syndrome research through the INCLUDE initiative https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/global-applauds-final-action-on-fiscal-year-2022-federal-expenditures-act-which-includes-a-10-million-increase-for-nih-down-syndrome-research-through-the-include-initiative/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 23:56:00 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/global-applauds-final-action-on-fiscal-year-2022-federal-expenditures-act-which-includes-a-10-million-increase-for-nih-down-syndrome-research-through-the-include-initiative/ Global Self-Advocates and Congressional Champions are key to this victory Frank Stephens at the Congressional Hearing with the Global Down Syndrome Foundation Frank Stephens is the first person with Down syndrome to testify at a congressional hearing where he received a standing ovation after his remarks. Increased funding will help researchers pursue some of the […]]]>

Global Self-Advocates and Congressional Champions are key to this victory

Frank Stephens at the Congressional Hearing with the Global Down Syndrome Foundation

Frank Stephens is the first person with Down syndrome to testify at a congressional hearing where he received a standing ovation after his remarks.

Increased funding will help researchers pursue some of the most neglected areas of research and care

The new funding includes a request from Congress for the NIH to make new investments in addressing racial and health disparities for African Americans with Down syndrome, <a class=mosaic Down syndrome, dual diagnosis of autism and Down syndrome and metabolic dysregulation.” src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/s6YdWr.D1PYlqyUUlvzbAg–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTQyMDtoPTMyOQ–/https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/iapN0ikojccpPZR6hI_kfA–~B/aD0yMzU7dz0zMDA7YXBwaWQ9eXRhY2h5b24-/https://media.zenfs.com/en/globenewswire.com/e877d6885bd4f8f89f87bc3c1b11a73d”/>

The new funding includes a request from Congress for the NIH to make new investments in addressing racial and health disparities for African Americans with Down syndrome, mosaic Down syndrome, dual diagnosis of autism and Down syndrome and metabolic dysregulation.

DENVER, CO, March 16, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — This week, on March 15, 2022, President Biden signed into law the $1.5 trillion omnibus federal spending bill for fiscal year 2022, which includes a $10 million increase in funding for Down syndrome research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) above the previous year’s funding level. The bill passed the US House of Representatives and Senate the previous week. Total funding for FY22 is approximately $115 million.

This significant increase in Down syndrome research funding will specifically benefit the NIH’s INCLUDE (Investigating Co-Occurring Conditions Across the Lifespan to Understand Down Syndrome) initiative, which is led by the Office of the NIH Director and was launched with the help of Global Down Syndrome Foundation.

The Global Down Syndrome Foundation (GLOBAL) and our national network of self-advocates and family members have successfully advocated for the establishment of a trans-NIH Down syndrome research initiative within the budget of fiscal year 2018 and have secured funding increases for the initiative every year since its establishment.

The new funding provided by the Expenditure Act also includes a request from Congress for the NIH to make new investments in addressing racial and health disparities for African Americans with Down syndrome, Down syndrome in mosaic, dual diagnosis of autism and Down syndrome and metabolic dysregulation.

GLOBAL is deeply grateful for the support and leadership of House Appropriations Committee Chair Rosa DeLauro (D-CT), Labor-HHS Subcommittee Ranking Member Tom Cole (R-OK), representative Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-CA), of the representative. Jaime Herrera Beutler (R-WA), Deputy Chair Katherine Clark (D-MA), Rep. Cheri Bustos (D-IL), and all committee members who supported this year’s increase.

GLOBAL has led a multi-year international advocacy campaign to raise awareness among policy makers of the unprecedented scientific opportunities related to the presence of three copies of chromosome 21 (instead of two), which causes Down syndrome. This leads to a radically different disease spectrum for people with Down syndrome, as these individuals are predisposed or protected against the major diseases that are the cause of death for more than 50% of Americans.

Through GLOBAL’s leadership, a bipartisan, bicameral group in Congress included language in the fiscal year 2018 spending bill calling on the National Institutes of Health to launch a trans-NIH program led by the Office of the NIH Director. to harness the power of multiple institutes. to expand the science around Down syndrome and co-occurring conditions like cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease.

The INCLUDE initiative has been a resounding success, spearheaded by the Office of the NIH Director with support from NIH leaders Drs. Francis Collins, Lawrence Tabak, Diana Bianchi, Gary Gibbons and other institute directors such as Dr. Richard Hodes. The initiative has already led to significant breakthroughs in our understanding of immune system dysregulation, new studies focusing on the increased prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease in people with Down syndrome, and the creation of a center National Down Syndrome Data Coordinating Agency, improving the health and quality of life of people with Down Syndrome as well as the millions of people who do not have Down Syndrome.

###

About the World Down Syndrome Foundation

The Global Down Syndrome Foundation (GLOBAL) is the largest nonprofit organization in the United States working to save lives and dramatically improve health outcomes for people with Down syndrome. GLOBAL has donated more than $32 million to create the first Down Syndrome Research Institute that supports more than 400 scientists and over 2,000 Down Syndrome patients from 33 states and 10 countries. Working closely with Congress and the National Institutes of Health, GLOBAL is the leading advocacy organization in the United States for Down syndrome research and care. GLOBAL has over 120 organizations with Down syndrome worldwide and is part of a network of affiliates – the Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome, the Sie Center for Down Syndrome and the University of Colorado Alzheimer’s and Cognition Center – all on the Anschutz Medical Campus .

GLOBAL’s widely distributed medical publications include Global guidelines on medical care for adults with Down syndrome, Prenatal Screening and Down Syndrome Informationand the award-winning magazine Down Syndrome WorldMT. GLOBAL also organizes the Be Beautiful Be Yourself Fashion Show, the largest Down syndrome fundraiser in the world. Visit globaldownsyndrome.org and follow us on social media (Facebook & Twitter: @GDSFoundation, Instagram: @globaldownsyndrome).

Attachments

CONTACT: Anca Call Global Down Syndrome Foundation (720) 320-3832 anca.consultant@globaldownsyndrome.org
]]>
‘Babel’ and the search for the ‘perfect human being’ – NEIU Independent https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/babel-and-the-search-for-the-perfect-human-being-neiu-independent/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 20:15:08 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/babel-and-the-search-for-the-perfect-human-being-neiu-independent/ Photos courtesy of Susana Susana Ortiz The search for the perfect world, the perfect civilization, the perfect human being is a recurrent theme, a fundamental question and perhaps intrinsic to our nature. How can we improve the world as a society, as individuals? The history of mankind is largely the history of the answers to […]]]>

Photos courtesy of Susana Susana Ortiz

The search for the perfect world, the perfect civilization, the perfect human being is a recurrent theme, a fundamental question and perhaps intrinsic to our nature. How can we improve the world as a society, as individuals? The history of mankind is largely the history of the answers to these questions in action, operating on the face of the earth. Literature has also contributed to this debate, but instead of just looking back, it has the power to imagine how far the consequences of the ideas that guide the action of humanity in the paths traced since today.

The lesson we can learn from history, of the times when paradise on Earth was promised, is that with the best intentions – or disguised as the best intentions – the greatest atrocities are committed. The role of dystopias is perhaps not to give lessons but to suggest questions, to shake up, to awaken, to open our eyes to what is not yet but could be, or even more alarming, to show what is already happening but remains in some way hidden from our eyes. Instead of the brutal inevitability of history, dystopias, while painting sometimes dire pictures, offer hope that something can still be done about it.

Photos courtesy of Susana Susana Ortiz

“Babel” deals tangentially with a dark page of history that cannot be erased but can be prevented from repeating: eugenics. The eugenics movement was born at the end of the 19th century by trying to apply Darwin’s theories to human beings. Francis Galton, cousin of Charles Darwin himself, is considered the father of eugenics, defined in his own words as “the study of all agents under human control which can improve or alter the racial quality of future generations” . This affirmation carries an inherently racist formulation and the denial of the equality of all human beings, of their equal worth and dignity.

Theories of scientific racism were nurtured from the seed of eugenics, which reached wide development in the United States with authors such as Madison Grant with “The Passing of the Great Race”, a book published in 1916, where he made the declaration of racial superiority to northern Europeans. This publication contributed to the founding of the American Eugenics Society in 1921, an organization from which eugenics theories were transformed into government policies, such as the forced sterilization of people with disabilities or mental illness, but especially the black population. Later he was praised by Hitler.

These racist and eugenic policies explicitly served as a model for the Nuremberg Laws that institutionalized the persecution of Jews in Nazi Germany. They were taken to extremes with the mass sterilization of Jewish women and the Aktion-T4 plan which ended the lives of hundreds of thousands of people who, due to different physical or psychological disabilities, were considered a burden. finance and genetics for German society and state.

Photos courtesy of Susana Susana Ortiz

In the world of “Babel”, the racial component of early 20th century eugenics has been overcome, but instead, the new eugenics establishes the criteria for determining which lives are worth living and which are not. are not based on genetic parameters. Only the fittest should be born for “the good of the community”, which is again a similar approach to that of Nazi Germany since it is an exclusive community, of which only “the certified” are a part.

The new eugenics, using scientific and technological progress, develops and carries genetic determinism to the final consequences, an idea already present in the first eugenics movement and postulates that we are determined in all aspects of our existence by our genetic material and that the human being beings do not change. However, the evidence against this claim is overwhelming. The personal experience of any individual is enough to show that life is in constant evolution and that if genetics is a factor to be taken into account, it is a conditioning element but not a determining one. Our history, our experiences, our decisions, our freedom of action and our conscience tell more about someone than any genotype.

Determining who should or should not live by their genetic information is an arbitrary decision, much like the 19th century race theories used by early eugenicists. They also believed that they acted following the infallibility of science and progress. But what is science if not a relative and partial knowledge of the immensity of the universe? What is progress but a word empty of content and in need of direction? Science and progress must be placed at the service of all of humanity and, at the same time, of each human being in a particular and personal way. Not the opposite. When humanity ceases to be an end to become a means, human life – especially that of vulnerable, oppressed and discriminated groups – becomes something disposable, substitutable. As Hannah Arendt said: “Where human life becomes shallow, totalitarianism lurks”

In “Babel” we see how the lives of those who do not meet genetic standards are directly cut short without further consideration. Seeing this on stage may surprise or even shock us, but the truth is that the reality is not far away. Considered one of the fathers of modern genetics, Jérôme Lejeune, the French scientist who discovered trisomy 21, or Down syndrome, also developed amniocentesis as a prenatal diagnostic tool soon after. His biggest fear was that instead of becoming a scientific breakthrough to treat and improve the quality of life for people with Down syndrome, it would become a means of eliminating them before they were born. His fears have been confirmed over time as well as in the case of people with spina bifida or even with easily treatable diagnoses like cleft lip.

Photos courtesy of Susana Susana Ortiz

I can’t get out of my head two moments at the theater when Renee and Ann said they didn’t want to bring a “monster into the world.” Is it possible that a child, a baby, no matter how serious, is a monster? Can a defenseless being without guilt or evil be a monster? Wouldn’t it be the other way around? Those who consider them “monsters”, those who deny their humanity, aren’t they the real monsters?

I kept thinking about that word, ‘monster’, and discovered that after all – although a shiver ran down my spine when I heard it in the room – ‘monster’ is not not a wholly inappropriate way of designating those who are different. It is a word that comes from the Latin “monstrum” – to show – which is derived from the verb “monere”, which means to warn. According to classic literature, a monster was a warning sent to the world by supernatural forces to communicate a message.

Perhaps those we insist on calling monsters are there to tell us something, to show us that the perfect human being is none other than the one capable of showing humanity, of coming out of his selfishness, of give on behalf of others. To warn us that the true human being is the one who is able to see in the eyes of others, even in those who are different, perfect human beings, just like him, with the same value and the same dignity.

]]>
Prenatal and Newborn Genetic Testing Market Size and Forecast https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/prenatal-and-newborn-genetic-testing-market-size-and-forecast/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 00:14:54 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/prenatal-and-newborn-genetic-testing-market-size-and-forecast/ New Jersey, United States,- This Prenatal and Neonatal Genetic Testing Market The report is the product of in-depth market research and commentary on important factors that influence financial decisions. Here useful information about customer demands are provided in order to launch the best product or service in the market. The adverse effects of COVID-19 on […]]]>

New Jersey, United States,- This Prenatal and Neonatal Genetic Testing Market The report is the product of in-depth market research and commentary on important factors that influence financial decisions. Here useful information about customer demands are provided in order to launch the best product or service in the market. The adverse effects of COVID-19 on the global economic system are also captured in this way. Due to the pandemic, some companies have suffered considerable financial losses. Several companies are struggling to emerge from the deteriorated situation of COVID-19. This Prenatal and Neonatal Genetic Testing Market report covers major patterns affecting each industry throughout the pandemic. It then discusses important goals, pricing strategies, and ways to help market players thrive, in addition to providing useful data. Stimulating economic activity is simple using the insights from this market research.

Get Sample Full PDF Copy of Report: (Including Full Table of Contents, List of Tables and Figures, Chart) @ https://www.verifiedmarketresearch.com/download-sample/?rid=38619

Statistical surveys offer a legitimate perspective of the industry, market size and development, future patterns and trading. These are considered while arranging this Prenatal and Neonatal Genetic Testing Market report with the quantified time period from 2022 to 2029. This report contains total and conventional market situation along with the variables which may the negatively affect. It also comprehensively outlines a serious examination alongside key profiles and techniques they receive in the market to keep their situation abreast. This Prenatal and Neonatal Genetic Testing Market report covers the broad objectives and adapts with the latest developments that are likely to influence the market circumstances to a great extent. All data regarding COVID-19 and its impact that distinct industry sectors are facing is being memorized for the global market report. Some concise and broad regions are comprehensively contained and clarified for newbie business visionaries who want to understand the market and derive productive increases from it.

Key Players Mentioned in the Prenatal and Newborn Genetic Testing Market Research Report:

Abbott Laboratories, Qiagen NV Bio-Rad Laboratories, Natera, Illumina, Inc.

Global Prenatal and Neonatal Genetic Testing Market Segmentation:

Prenatal and Newborn Genetic Testing Market by Disease

• Down syndrome
• Phenylketonuria
• Cystic
• Fibrosis
• Sickle cell anemia
• Others

Prenatal and Newborn Genetic Testing Market by End Use

• Hospitals
• Maternity
• Speciality
• Clinics
• Diagnostic centers

Get a discount on the purchase of this report @ https://www.verifiedmarketresearch.com/ask-for-discount/?rid=38619

Scope of the Prenatal and Newborn Genetic Testing Market Report

ATTRIBUTES DETAILS
ESTIMATED YEAR 2022
YEAR OF REFERENCE 2021
FORECAST YEAR 2029
HISTORICAL YEAR 2020
UNITY Value (million USD/billion)
SECTORS COVERED Types, applications, end users, and more.
REPORT COVER Revenue Forecast, Business Ranking, Competitive Landscape, Growth Factors and Trends
BY REGION North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, Middle East and Africa
CUSTOMIZATION SCOPE Free report customization (equivalent to up to 4 analyst business days) with purchase. Added or changed country, region and segment scope.

It becomes easy to determine the pulse of the market with this detailed analysis of the Prenatal and Neonatal Genetic Testing Market. Key players can find all competitive data and market size of major regions like North America, Europe, Latin America, Asia-Pacific and Middle East. As part of the competitive analysis, certain strategies are profiled which are pursued by key players such as mergers, collaborations, acquisitions and new product launches. These strategies will greatly help industry players to strengthen their position in the market and grow their business.

Answers to key questions in the report:

1. Who are the top five players in the Prenatal and Neonatal Genetic Testing Market?

2. How will the prenatal and neonatal genetic testing market evolve over the next five years?

3. Which product and application will occupy the lion’s share of the prenatal and neonatal genetic testing market?

4. What are the drivers and restraints of the Prenatal and Neonatal Genetic Testing Market?

5. Which regional market will show the strongest growth?

6. What will be the CAGR and size of the Prenatal and Neonatal Genetic Testing market throughout the forecast period?

For more information or query or customization before buying, visit @ https://www.verifiedmarketresearch.com/product/prenatal-and-newborn-genetic-testing-market/

Visualize the Prenatal and Newborn Genetic Testing Market Using Verified Market Intelligence:-

Verified Market Intelligence is our BI platform for market narrative storytelling. VMI offers in-depth forecast trends and accurate insights on over 20,000 emerging and niche markets, helping you make critical revenue-impacting decisions for a bright future.

VMI provides a comprehensive overview and global competitive landscape with respect to region, country, and segment, as well as key players in your market. Present your market report and results with an integrated presentation function that saves you more than 70% of your time and resources for presentations to investors, sales and marketing, R&D and product development. products. VMI enables data delivery in Excel and interactive PDF formats with over 15+ key market indicators for your market.

Visualize the Prenatal and Newborn Genetic Testing Market using VMI@ https://www.verifiedmarketresearch.com/vmintelligence/

About Us: Verified Market Research®

Verified Market Research® is a leading global research and advisory firm that for over 10 years has provided advanced analytical research solutions, personalized advice and in-depth data analysis to individuals and businesses seeking accurate research, reliable and up to date. data and technical advice. We provide insight into strategic and growth analytics, the data needed to achieve business goals, and help make critical revenue decisions.

Our research studies help our clients make superior data-driven decisions, understand market forecasts, capitalize on future opportunities, and maximize efficiency by working as a partner to deliver accurate and valuable insights. The industries we cover span a wide spectrum, including technology, chemicals, manufacturing, energy, food and beverage, automotive, robotics, packaging, construction, mining and the gas. etc

At Verified Market Research, we help in understanding holistic market indicator factors and most current and future market trends. Our analysts, with their deep expertise in data collection and governance, use industry techniques to gather and review data at all stages. They are trained to combine modern data collection techniques, superior research methodology, subject matter expertise and years of collective experience to produce informative and accurate research.

Having served over 5000 clients, we have provided reliable market research services to over 100 Global Fortune 500 companies such as Amazon, Dell, IBM, Shell, Exxon Mobil, General Electric, Siemens, Microsoft, Sony and Hitachi. We have co-consulted with some of the world’s leading consulting firms such as McKinsey & Company, Boston Consulting Group, Bain and Company for custom research and consulting projects for companies around the world.

Contact us:

Mr. Edwyne Fernandes

Verified Market Research®

USA: +1 (650)-781-4080
UK: +44 (753)-715-0008
APAC: +61 (488)-85-9400
US toll free: +1 (800)-782-1768

E-mail: [email protected]

Website:- https://www.verifiedmarketresearch.com/

]]>
Tips from the editors of POPSUGAR for coping with anxiety symptoms https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/tips-from-the-editors-of-popsugar-for-coping-with-anxiety-symptoms/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 23:40:02 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/tips-from-the-editors-of-popsugar-for-coping-with-anxiety-symptoms/ Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the United States, and whether you have a clear diagnosis or not, anxiety can impact your daily life. Although the physical symptoms are all too real – increased heart rate, muscle tension, headaches, changes in appetite, gastrointestinal issues, etc. – internal effects such as intrusive thoughts […]]]>

Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the United States, and whether you have a clear diagnosis or not, anxiety can impact your daily life. Although the physical symptoms are all too real – increased heart rate, muscle tension, headaches, changes in appetite, gastrointestinal issues, etc. – internal effects such as intrusive thoughts can send people into a spiral. I know because I’ve been there.

Conason Psychological Services Therapist Fatema Jivanjee-Shakir, LMSW, tells POPSUGAR that it’s “common for people to experience anxiety without meeting diagnostic criteria for an anxiety disorder,” pointing to a 2014 systematic review. which found that twice as many people met the criteria for “subthreshold generalized anxiety disorder” than the full syndrome.

“When your anxiety keeps you from being present in your life, it’s a sign that it’s getting worse and needs professional support,” says Jivanjee-Shakir, adding that you don’t have really do it. meet the diagnostic criteria to find help. She goes on to note that people “often approach anxiety-provoking situations with avoidance, which breeds even more anxiety and fear about the situation.”

Instead, she explains, it’s helpful to develop supportive coping skills to navigate these situations, especially identifying when each coping mechanism feels accessible for the type of anxiety. feeling. For example, meditation may work when your anxiety is at three out of 10, she says, but it may not be tangible if your anxiety is at seven out of 10.

Psychologist Ashu Kapoor, PhD, agrees, telling POPSUGAR that she emphasizes the importance of healthy coping mechanisms over unhealthy ones. “Not all coping skills will work for all of my clients,” she notes. However, “I say, if it works, use it.”

Ahead, the editors of POPSUGAR reveal their top tips for dealing with anxiety. Try some for yourself the next time you’re overwhelmed and anxious – you might be surprised at what helps. And of course, seek professional advice if necessary.

]]>
Does genetics affect alcohol consumption? https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/does-genetics-affect-alcohol-consumption/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 21:10:07 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/does-genetics-affect-alcohol-consumption/ Genetics may play a role in alcohol use disorder (AUD), but other factors may also contribute to the development of this condition. Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a condition in which it is difficult to stop drinking alcohol, even though it affects your work, your relationships and your health. Alcohol use disorder used to be […]]]>

Genetics may play a role in alcohol use disorder (AUD), but other factors may also contribute to the development of this condition.

Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a condition in which it is difficult to stop drinking alcohol, even though it affects your work, your relationships and your health.

Alcohol use disorder used to be called alcoholism, alcohol dependence, or alcohol abuse. This condition affects multiple brain systems, which can cause some people to develop a physical dependence on alcohol.

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), 5.6% of adults in the United States were living with an alcohol use disorder in 2019.

This represents approximately 14.1 million adults. Additionally, approximately 1.7% adolescents aged 12 to 17 were reported to have an alcohol use disorder in 2019.

Many people wonder what causes alcohol use disorders and whether they are genetic. Although genes can influence whether or not alcohol use disorder develops, environmental factors can also play a role.

Alcohol use disorder can be hereditary or genetic, which means it can run in families. Children of people with AUD may be 2 to 6 times more likely to develop alcohol use problems than those whose parents do not have an alcohol use disorder.

However, the causes of AUD go beyond genetics and can be quite complex. AUD doesn’t form because of a single gene, and genetics isn’t the only reason someone develops an alcohol use disorder.

The NIAAA points out that genes are only responsible for about half the risk of developing an AUD. Environmental factors can also play a role in determining whether someone develops this condition.

Some people may have a genetic predisposition to alcohol use disorders. You may be more likely to develop this disease if you have a history of it in your family.

There is not just one “alcohol use disorder gene”. Rather, there are many different genes that can influence whether someone develops alcohol use disorder.

Like a articles from 2015 in Nature points out that researchers have not been able to identify a single gene that determines whether or not you develop an addiction.

Many different traits, including some hereditary, can play a role.

But at the same time research is still in progress to identify the causative and protective genes of alcohol use disorders, it is not currently common practice to test these genes.

Only a small number of medical conditions can be identified by genetic testing at present, such as:

  • Down syndrome
  • Huntington’s disease
  • sickle cell disease

Living with inherited mental health issues can increase the likelihood of developing an alcohol use disorder.

Certain mental health conditions can be a risk factor for developing an alcohol use disorder, including clinical depression and schizophrenia, which also have a genetic component.

Yes. If alcohol tends to make you sick, it could be due to a genetic component.

According to a 2019 reviewthe ADH1B and ALDH2 genes can affect the way our body metabolizes alcohol, causing symptoms such as:

ADH1B and ALDH2 may also protect against alcohol consumption and alcohol use disorders.

If drinking alcohol makes you sick, you may be more likely to avoid alcohol in the first place, which can lower your chances of developing an alcohol use disorder.

For this reason, people with the ADH1B and ALDH2 genes may be less likely to develop the disease than those without.

Genetic demography

The genetic variations that lead to alcohol-related nausea, headaches, and flushing may be more common among those of Asian or Jewish descent. These groups generally have a lower risk of developing an alcohol use disorder compared to other populations.

Besides genetics, there are a number of risk factors for developing an alcohol use disorder.

Some risk factors may include:

Research has suggested that it’s a combination of the above risk factors as well as genetics that could determine whether or not you develop an alcohol use disorder.

This is not to say that people who have experienced the above will definitely develop an alcohol use disorder. These factors may simply make some people more susceptible to developing the disease.

If you are living with an alcohol use disorder, know that you are not alone and there are treatment options.

Many people seek medical treatment for AUD and can work with a therapist to learn coping strategies to minimize alcohol cravings and triggers.

Consulting your doctor is often the best first step in seeking treatment, as AUD can be fatal if not medically treated. You can use the NIAAA Alcohol Treatment Navigator to find treatment options in your area, or call the SAMHSA National Helpline at 800-662-HELP (4357) for help.

You might also find it helpful to confide in a trusted loved one whose support can be instrumental in your recovery. Reaching out to others can also be helpful. You can also research support groups online or in your area for people with substance use disorders.

]]>
Natera: Latest Landmark SMART Study Publication Confirms High Accuracy of Natera Panorama® NIPT for Screening Common Aneuploidies https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/natera-latest-landmark-smart-study-publication-confirms-high-accuracy-of-natera-panorama-nipt-for-screening-common-aneuploidies/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 17:08:25 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/natera-latest-landmark-smart-study-publication-confirms-high-accuracy-of-natera-panorama-nipt-for-screening-common-aneuploidies/ AUSTIN, Texas, February 17, 2022 –Natera, Inc.(NASDAQ: NTRA), a world leader in cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing,announced that another manuscript of the landmark SMART study has been published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology(AJOG), one of the world’s leading medical journals of obstetrics and gynecology. This publicationdescribes the performance of the SNP-based noninvasive prenatal […]]]>

AUSTIN, Texas, February 17, 2022 –Natera, Inc.(NASDAQ: NTRA), a world leader in cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing,announced that another manuscript of the landmark SMART study has been published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology(AJOG), one of the world’s leading medical journals of obstetrics and gynecology. This publicationdescribes the performance of the SNP-based noninvasive prenatal test (NIPT) Panorama to screen for common aneuploidies.1Earlier this month, results from the SMART study for screening for 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were also publishedin AJOG.2

SMART is the largest prospective NIPT study ever, with more than 20,000 patients enrolled at 21 US and international sites. All results included in the analysis have been validated by genetic confirmation. The study rigorously tested Panorama, confirming its market-leading performance in a real environment. The study also included validation of a new artificial intelligence-based deep learning algorithm for Panorama called Panorama AI, which uses information from more than 2 million cfDNA tests performed by Natera.

The main results of this publication include:

  • Panorama demonstrated 99% sensitivity and >99.95% specificity for trisomy 21 in a real-world setting, consistent with previously published studies.3
  • Panorama’s positive predictive value (PPV) for trisomy 21 was 95%. This PPV means that for every 100 positive results, 95 were confirmed to have trisomy 21. trisomy 21. .4
  • Panorama AI maintained high sensitivity, detected additional cases of common aneuploidies, and significantly lowered the no-call rate to 1.5% and 0.6% after re-draw.

“Panorama’s unique performance and capabilities have now been documented in 25 peer-reviewed publications, including more than 1.3 million patients – more patients than all other NIPTs combined. With SMART, we have demonstrated excellent performance, in a large prospective study,” said Ramesh Hariharan. , Managing Director of Women’s Health at Natera. “We are proud of our commitment to innovation and the ability to positively impact millions of pregnancies, dramatically reducing Panorama’s prior false positive rate for prenatal screening.

“Natera thanks the SMART researchers for their work on this landmark study,” said Dr. Russ Jelsema, Senior Medical Director of Women’s Health at Natera. “By giving families critical and highly accurate information about their baby early in pregnancy, we can both improve outcomes for babies with common chromosomal aneuploidies and provide better support for their unique health needs in later life. birth.”

About Panorama®

Panoramareveals a baby’s risk for serious genetic disorders as early as nine weeks of pregnancy. The test uses a unique technology based on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) to analyze fetal/placental DNA obtained by blood sampling from the mother. It is the only commercially available test that differentiates between maternal and fetal DNA to assess the risk of aneuploidies. The test also screens twin pregnancies for each baby’s zygosity and fetal sex and it identifies the risk of more genetic conditions in twin pregnancies than any other NIPT. Panorama is one of Natera’s many genetic screening tests designed to help families on the path to parenthood. Natera has published 25 papers, studying more than 1.3 million patients, since the launch of Panorama – the largest body of evidence in space today. Panorama was developed and its performance characteristics determined by Natera, the CLIA-certified laboratory performing the test. The test has not been cleared or approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). CAP accredited, ISO 13485 certified and CLIA certified.

About Natera

Natera™ is a global leader in cell-free DNA testing, dedicated to oncology, women’s health and organ health. Our goal is to integrate personalized genetic testing and diagnostics into the standard of care to protect health and enable earlier, more targeted interventions that help lead longer, healthier lives. Natera’s tests are validated by over 100 peer-reviewed publications that demonstrate high accuracy. Natera operates laboratories that are ISO 13485 certified and CAP accredited under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) in Austin, Texas and San Carlos, California. For more information, visit www.natera.com.

Forward-looking statements

All statements other than statements of historical facts contained in this press release are forward-looking statements and do not constitute a representation that Natera’s plans, estimates or expectations will be achieved. These forward-looking statements represent Natera’s expectations as of the date of this press release, and Natera disclaims any obligation to update any forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are subject to known and unknown risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially, including with respect to our ability to successfully increase demand and grow revenue for our product offerings, whether whether the results of clinical studies or other studies will support the use of our product offerings, our expectations regarding the reliability, accuracy, and performance of our tests, or the benefits of our tests and product offerings. products for patients, providers and payers. Additional risks and uncertainties are discussed in more detail in the “Risk Factors” section of Natera’s recent filings on Forms 10-K and 10-Q and in other filings by Natera with the SEC from time to time. other. These documents are available at www.natera.com/investorsand www.sec.gov.

contacts

Investor Relations: Mike Brophy, Chief Financial Officer, Natera, Inc., 510-826-2350

Media: Kate Stabrawa, Communications, Natera, Inc., pr@natera.com

The references

  1. Dar P, Jacobson B, MacPherson C, et al. Cell-free DNA screening for trisomies 21, 18 and 13 in pregnancies at low and high risk of aneuploidy with genetic confirmation. AJOG2022 in press
  2. Dar P, Jacobsson B, Clifton R, et al. Cell-free DNA screening for prenatal detection of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. AJOG2022 in press.
  3. Ryan A, Hunkapiller N, Banjevic M, et al. Validation of an improved version of a non-invasive prenatal test based on single nucleotide polymorphism for the detection of fetal aneuploidies.Fetal diagnosis. 2016;40(3):219-223.
  4. Norton ME, Jacobsson B, Swamy GK, et al. Cell-free DNA analysis for the non-invasive examination of trisomy. N Engl J Med. 2015;372(17):1589-1597.
]]>
Missouri High Court: Referendum Laws Hinder Voters’ Rights https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/missouri-high-court-referendum-laws-hinder-voters-rights/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 21:55:24 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/missouri-high-court-referendum-laws-hinder-voters-rights/ JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. The Missouri Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday that the people’s right to influence laws passed by the Legislative Assembly have been unlawfully limited by lawmakers themselves, making it easier for voters to overturn General Assembly acts. led by the GOP. In a 5-2 decision, the justices wrote that the right of Missouri […]]]>

The Missouri Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday that the people’s right to influence laws passed by the Legislative Assembly have been unlawfully limited by lawmakers themselves, making it easier for voters to overturn General Assembly acts. led by the GOP.

In a 5-2 decision, the justices wrote that the right of Missouri citizens to overrule laws passed by the Legislature is a “fundamental expression of the power held by the people.”

“The Legislature must not be allowed to use procedural formalities to interfere with or fetter this constitutional right which is so integral to Missouri’s democratic system of government,” Justice Mary Russell wrote.

The case stems from a 2019 Missouri law banning most abortions after eight weeks of pregnancy.

Tuesday’s decision ultimately won’t affect the fate of the anti-abortion law — which is currently stalled by a separate federal court case — but could make it easier for people to force a statewide vote. about future laws they don’t like.

Critics of the abortion law had filed a lawsuit after running out of time to collect signatures to put the measure to a public vote. They blamed the delays on the Secretary of State’s office.

In Missouri, referendum petitions must be submitted to the secretary of state’s office 90 days after the end of the legislative session in which the law was passed. A 1997 state law requires that petitions contain an official ballot title certified by the Secretary of State, and another law sets procedural time limits for the Secretary of State to approve that ballot title.

The American Civil Liberties Union and the No Bans No Choice group sought to overturn those rules after Republican Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft used his allotted time to approve the ballot title, leaving petition collectors just two weeks to collect hundreds of thousands of signatures. .

Ashcroft had argued that even with such a tight deadline, it is still possible to collect enough signatures to put a law to a referendum vote.

But Russell wrote that, especially for people who cannot afford to pay workers to collect signatures, deadlines are a barrier to accessing the referendum process.

“Missouri’s Constitution guarantees the right of referendum to all citizens of Missouri, not just those capable of raising the funds necessary to complete a signature-collecting effort under the tightest of deadlines,” she said. writing.

A spokeswoman for the secretary of state did not immediately comment on the decision on Tuesday.

Russell also pointed out that lawmakers can delay passing laws until the end of the legislative session by about five months to exhaust the time available for potential referendum efforts, essentially giving lawmakers “the power to make any referendum effort untenable”.

Justices Brent Powell and Zel Fischer dissented, arguing that striking down the referendum laws was an overreach.

Powell wrote that to dismiss a law as unconstitutional, plaintiffs must prove that there is no way the law could be constitutionally enforced. He wrote that there are certain circumstances in which the ballot title deadline would not interfere with referendum efforts, such as when lawmakers pass legislation at the start of the session.

Voters and lawmakers in Missouri have been caught in a power struggle for the right to legislate for years.

In 2018, voters struck down a new law banning mandatory union dues in Missouri, thwarting a longstanding effort by GOP lawmakers to pass the measure. And after years of inaction by lawmakers, voters used the state initiative petition process to expand eligibility for the Medicaid health care program and allow medical marijuana.

After voters approved changes to the redistricting process in 2018, lawmakers sent a recast of those changes to the ballot in 2020. Voters ultimately approved lawmakers’ recast.

The 2019 abortion law that sparked the latest legal battle sought to ban the procedure at eight weeks pregnant except in medical emergencies. It included a staircase of further abortion bans at 14, 18 or 20 weeks if any of the earlier restrictions were overturned by a court. He also sought to ban abortions based solely on race, gender, or a diagnosis indicating Down syndrome.

The abortion law was never enforced because a federal judge blocked it a day before it went into effect.

Last year, the 8th United States Circuit Court of Appeals heard arguments on an appeal of the injunction. A decision has not yet been rendered.

]]>
The Courts of Appeal decide on compensation cases for lawyers; tribes agree to settle on opioids https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/the-courts-of-appeal-decide-on-compensation-cases-for-lawyers-tribes-agree-to-settle-on-opioids/ Fri, 04 Feb 2022 21:28:21 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/the-courts-of-appeal-decide-on-compensation-cases-for-lawyers-tribes-agree-to-settle-on-opioids/ Homepage Daily News Weekly Briefs: Courts of Appeal rule on lawyer… News roundup Weekly Briefs: Courts of Appeal decide lawyers’ restitution cases; tribes agree to settle on opioids By Debra Cassens-Weiss February 4, 2022, 3:15 p.m. CST Image from Shutterstock. Ex-BigLaw partner to pay $537 million in tax evasion scheme Paul M. Daugerdas, a former […]]]>

News roundup

Weekly Briefs: Courts of Appeal decide lawyers’ restitution cases; tribes agree to settle on opioids

Image from Shutterstock.

Ex-BigLaw partner to pay $537 million in tax evasion scheme

Paul M. Daugerdas, a former partner at Jenkens & Gilchrist, lost an appeal in his tax evasion case in the 2nd US Circuit Court of Appeals in New York on Monday. Daugerdas had challenged the financial penalties imposed after his 2013 conviction for the fraudulent tax shelter scheme. The 2nd Circuit upheld Daugerdas’ orders to forfeit $165 million and pay $371 million in restitution. Daugerdas, 71, is not expected to be released from federal prison until 2027. (Law360, Reuters, January 31 summary order)

Confirmation of lawyer’s embezzlement conviction

The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta on Tuesday upheld the conviction of former managing partner of Morris Hardwick Schneider, accused of embezzling $26 million from the real estate law firm. The appeals court said the government had provided substantial evidence to support Nathan Hardwick’s conviction. But the court overturned a $40 million restitution order imposed against Hardwick and the accounting director of his former law firm. The court ordered the remand trial judge to make factual findings about restitution. (Courthouse News Service, February 1 notice)

Tribes reach $590 million opioid deal

Hundreds of Native American tribes have reached a $590 million settlement with Johnson & Johnson and three drug distributors to settle lawsuits alleging the companies contributed to the opioid epidemic. The Cherokee Nation has already reached a $75 million settlement with the drug distributors. (The New York Times, Reuters, Bloomberg Law)

6th Circuit reinstates ban on abortion with Down syndrome

The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati on Wednesday reinstated a Tennessee law that prohibits abortions if the provider knows they are wanted because of race, gender, or a diagnosis of Down syndrome. . At the same time, the court delayed hearing the challenge to Tennessee’s abortion restrictions. In a dissenting opinion, Judge Karen Nelson Moore argued that the appeals court appeared to be delaying the case, so she could be the first to apply any new standard emanating from the United States Supreme Court when she will speak out on Mississippi’s restrictive abortion law. (The Associated Press, Law.com, opinion of February 2)

Prosecutors drop disability fraud case against lawyer

A federal judge in San Francisco has dismissed a wire fraud case against an attorney accused of collecting disability benefits while working for a university and advising two law firms. Senior U.S. District Judge Susan Illston of the Northern District of California dismissed the case against Lawrence Rufrano last month after prosecutors decided to drop the charges. Rufrano, a former financial analyst for the Federal Reserve Board of Governors, told the ABA Journal he was falsely accused. He believes the allegations were based on an incomplete investigation and incomplete data on his medical history. (The dismissal of January 3)

The 9th Circuit upholds California’s net neutrality law

Last Friday, the 9th United States Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco upheld California’s net neutrality law. The law requires Internet Service Providers to treat web traffic the same. The appeals court said the state law was not preempted by a 2018 decision by the Federal Communications Commission to repeal federal net neutrality protections. (Courthouse News Service, Reuters, notice of January 28)

]]>
A variant of the coronavirus once helped the global pork industry. Could we be protected? | Science https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/a-variant-of-the-coronavirus-once-helped-the-global-pork-industry-could-we-be-protected-science/ Fri, 04 Feb 2022 13:08:33 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/a-variant-of-the-coronavirus-once-helped-the-global-pork-industry-could-we-be-protected-science/ Long before COVID-19 became a household word—in 1946To be specific, veterinary researchers at Purdue University reported that something invading the innards of young pigs caused diarrhea, vomiting and weight loss, ultimately killing most of them. Scientists didn’t know the cause of the disease, which devastated US pig farms, but they could trigger the disease by […]]]>

Long before COVID-19 became a household word—in 1946To be specific, veterinary researchers at Purdue University reported that something invading the innards of young pigs caused diarrhea, vomiting and weight loss, ultimately killing most of them. Scientists didn’t know the cause of the disease, which devastated US pig farms, but they could trigger the disease by feeding crushed pieces of diseased pig intestines to healthy piglets. This pig farmer’s nightmare, over time, turned out to be a coronavirus, which was named transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV).

To date, TGEV has never harmed a human, and its relationship to SARS-CoV-2, the driver of COVID-19, is remote. But after spreading around the world during the 1970s, TGEV took a strange turn: the disease it caused all but disappeared when an even more transmissible, but less harmful variant of TGEV essentially immunized pigs against the original virus. “The best coronavirus vaccine was made by nature,” says Stanley Perlman, a veteran coronavirus researcher at the University of Iowa.

The fate of TGEV was unveiled years ago, but some researchers have recently questioned whether the latest concerning SARS-CoV-2 variant, Omicron, could produce a similar twist in the ongoing human pandemic. Omicron causes far too many serious illnesses and deaths to celebrate as a savior – last week it recorded a higher daily death toll in the United States than the Delta variant at its peak. But some suspect it will also be a “natural vaccine” against more pathogenic strains.

Unlike COVID-19 vaccines, veterinary vaccines developed for TGEV had little impact and could not reverse the massive losses suffered by the livestock industry. But in the late 1970s, European farmers experienced the most unexpected relief: the disease caused by the virus began to fade and, over time, disappeared. “We didn’t quite understand what was going on,” says Maurice Pensaert, professor emeritus at Ghent University, who was then one of the few scientists in the world studying TGEV.

One oddity was that litters continued to test positive for TGEV on standard antibody tests. “There was no diarrhea at all, but the percentage of pigs with antibodies against TGEV was very high,” recalls Pensaert, whose fascination with the virus dates back to the 1960s when he went to graduate school. on the TGEV at Purdue University.

It appeared to Pensaert and his colleagues that perhaps another related virus was triggering the production of antibodies, protecting the little pigs. In 1984, they report the confirmation of this novel hypothesis, a new variant of TGEV. Just as Omicron has a different “tropism” than the original SARS-CoV-2 and other variants – it targets the upper airway bronchi rather than the lungs – the TGEV variant attacked different tissues from its parent. Although TGEV preferred cells from the gastrointestinal tract, the mutant preferred trachea, bronchi, and lungs. Pensaert and his colleagues therefore named it porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCV). “We never imagined that PRCV would emerge,” says Linda Saif, a veteran coronavirologist at The Ohio State University, Wooster, who developed TGEV vaccines in the 1970s as part of her master’s and doctorate. theses.

Work on porcine coronaviruses progressed slowly in the 1980s because research funding was scarce. “Coronaviruses weren’t important in humans, so nobody paid attention to this enteric virus or this respiratory strain in pigs,” Saif says.

PRCV surfaces in the United States in 1989, again protecting newborn piglets from TGEV. But its genetic sequence differed from that of the European cousin. “It wasn’t like it appeared in Europe and then traveled to the United States and started infecting pigs,” Saif says. “It rose independently.”

Like Omicron compared to previous variants, PRCV spreads much more easily than its predecessor. He started showing up on farms with what Saif calls “high security herds,” kept several miles away from other herds. “That’s how transmissible this coronavirus was by the respiratory route,” she says.

In another parallel to COVID-19, the pig story has its own speculation about the origins of a pandemic virus traced back to a lab. Pensaert wonders if PRCV in Europe evolved from a potential TGEV vaccine that he and his colleagues in Ghent made by repeatedly passing the original virus through cell culture to weaken or attenuate its pathogenicity. . The virus still alive in the vaccine was clearly different from PRCV, but it could have mutated further, perhaps in vaccinated animals or during commercial production of the vaccine, to create the variant. “It’s hard to say, but I’ve asked myself this question many times,” he says.

Saif thought the same about the attenuated TGEV vaccines used in the United States, but sequencing experiments revealed that the PRCV there had more in common with natural TGEV than the vaccine strains. (There is no clear explanation for how Omicron came into existence, which has also fueled some speculation that the variant originated in laboratory mice infected with SARS-CoV-2 or other research.)

Sequencing of TGEV and PRCV, however, revealed a surprising difference. In the surface protein gene, spike, PRCV had a deletion of more than 600 nucleotides. “It was a surprise for everyone,” says Saif. Stranger still, the deletion did not affect the spike receptor-binding domain, the small part of the protein whose shape plays a key role in attaching to a host cell and infecting it.

Research into PRCV and TGEV – which only began to receive serious funding after the emergence of a deadly human coronavirus disease, severe acute respiratory syndrome, in 2002 – finally showed the sequence codes lacking PRCV for the tip region which binds to sialic acids, sugars that decorate cells. The hypothesis, Saif says, is that this domain allows the tip of TGEV to bind to intestinal mucins, gel-forming proteins rich in sialic acids that make up the sticky goop between some cells. (They are best known for being an ingredient in snot.) Once attached to the tip, the sialic acids “prevent the virus from being washed away [of the intestines] before it can latch onto the cell receptor,” Saif explains. The absence of this sialic acid binding site is “the likely reason why PRCV can no longer infect the gut.”

When PRCV appeared, “suddenly we had a mild respiratory infection, we developed generalized herd immunity, and this virus was able to outcompete some of the other strains,” Saif says. As PRCV spread, large pig farms coincidentally stepped up measures to protect animals from all pathogens, so it is difficult to fully attribute the disappearance of TGEV to this natural vaccine. But she thinks the new variant played a role.

“Everyone hopes that will be the case with Omicron,” she adds. Omicron may also interact with mucins differently than previous variants, which could explain why it prefers to park in the upper airways rather than deep in the lungs, causing milder disease.

The Omicron-PRCV parallels break down in one extremely important way: the SARS-CoV-2 variant still causes many cases of severe disease in people who have not been vaccinated or lack immunity to natural infection . Both Saif and Pensaert point out that we also don’t know if infection with Omicron protects people against other variants that more easily cause serious illness.

Yet a later plot point in the pig saga suggests another way Omicron could help humans in the future. Some fear that Omicron and Delta could swap genetic material to produce a “recombinant” with the worst traits of the two: Omicron’s high transmissibility and Delta’s severity. But there is a contrasting and optimistic scenario proposed by TGEV and PRCV: they eventually recombined in a new US-dominant variant that spreads more easily than TGEV, does not cause severe disease in piglets, and can still thwart severe cases caused by TGEV, Saif says. If Omicron immunizes people safely and similarly recombines with and tames a more pathogenic variant of SARS-CoV-2, that would be “the best-case scenario,” she says.

The pig story has a big asterisk next to that fairy tale ending. In 2010, another coronavirus from the same branch of the coronavirus family tree began to devastate the little piggies. Called porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), it had circulated among pigs for decades without causing serious illness, but a highly virulent strain emerged in China. The variant found its way to the United States in 2013, possibly introduced via imported pig feed, suggests Saif.

PEDV vaccines hit the market to fight this deadly strain, but there is little real data to show they work. And recently, the PEDV/TGEV recombinants have started circulating. If this Three Little Swine Virus saga has any morals that apply to humans, Omicron or later, even milder variants could help curb the COVID-19 pandemic — for now. But they might not protect us from the next big, bad coronavirus to find a way to reach our doorstep.

Clarification, February 4, 10 a.m.: This story has been updated to note that the TGEV PRCV variant and the latest recombinant can cause mild disease in pigs, although symptoms are usually not as severe as those caused by the original virus. We also clarified that PEDV belongs to the same branch of the coronavirus family tree, but not to the same lineage. Linda Saif’s affiliation has also been corrected.

]]>